How do I sell my Structured Payments? 

All this process includes five steps:

  1. Make the decision to sell | you can start the sale of your settlement process if you have valid reasons for it and the sale of your payments will not have any effects on your future financial needs.
  2. Shop around to find the discount rate and service on your sale | it is important that you work with a funding company that is reputable and has your best interests in mind, uses its own money to fund (is not merely a broker), is experienced in completing the court ordered transfer process, and has A+ rating on the Better Business Bureau and very few complaints, if any. 
  3. Choose the company you like best and start the sales process | you must begin the paperwork process. After you submit the proper paperwork (your annuity policy, settlement agreement or benefit's letter so the transfer company can verify your payments, application, ID), all materials are reviewed to ensure they are complete and accurate.
  4. Have your sale approved by a judge | once the relevant documents are returned and they are fully signed, a local attorney files them with court and after that the court will schedule a hearing. This is the beginning of the waiting period. In the court you will be required to justify why the money is needed and you should be in a position to show that you are not putting your and your family‚Äôs financial future in jeopardy. Unless there are any problems with your request of transfer, the judges mostly approve the transfer at this stage.
  5. Get your money | Once approved, the judge will sign the order approving your transaction and the order is sent over to the insurance company to wire funds.

What is a Structured Settlement?

Structured settlement annuities are a financial instrument that is normally used to provide regular, tax free payments to personal injury victims over a long period of time. Instead of facing unexpected stress and management issues that come with receiving a lump sum of money, the recipient is protected from bad judgment that could result in spending a large portion of the money that he or she needs to manage a lifetime of injury related expenses.